The Self-Destructing Computer Chip Is Real

Xerox PARC engineers have developed a self-destructing computer chip that explodes into tiny pieces when triggered.

Developed as part of DARPA’s Vanishing Programmable Resources Project, the chip uses Gorilla Glass, which is found in numerous Smartphones around the world.

Speaking to PC World, PARC scientist Gregory Whiting explained: “we take the glass and we ion-exchange temper it to build in stress. What you get is glass that, because it’s heavily stressed, breaks it fragments into tiny little pieces.”

The chip was recently demoed at DARPA’s Wait What event earlier this month, where the chip was triggered using a laser, although both radio signals and a physical switch can be used to trigger the chip. When the correct circuit is switched on, a small resistor within the substrate heats up causing the glass to shatter. After the initial explosion, the shards continue to shatter into even smaller pieces, rendering the device unusable.

This isn’t the first time DARPA has shown interest in self-destructing tech. Back in February 2014, DARPA gave IBM $3.45 million to fund the development of a self-destructing computer chip. It’s believed that the technology will be used to protect sensitive encrypted data and military situations.

You can watch the self-destructing computer chip do its thing below.

This Article Will Self-Destruct In Ten Seconds

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